Pop Culture Collaborative Major Grants

Sponsor:

Pop Culture Collaborative

Deadline:

Proposals are by invite only. Please review the full RFP below to learn about the application process. Major grants are approved on a bi-annual cycle in both the Spring/Summer and Fall/Winter.

Summary:

The Pop Culture Collaborative seeks grantee partners committed to creating a pop culture narrative environment powerful enough to re-shape the American public’s imagination around people of color, immigrants, refugees and Muslims. Our focus is on individuals, projects and collaborations that deliberately work through entertainment and mass media—movies, episodic TV and streaming series, sports, games, books, music, advertising and pop-driven journalism—to transform the narratives, values, beliefs and behaviors of millions of people everyday.

Through a pop culture lens, our grantee partners devote their artistry, resources and strategic efforts to one or more of the following: creative storytelling, narrative strategy design and implementation, research and evaluation, knowledge building and sharing, training and strategy development, audience analysis and activation, and/or network creation and management. We are looking for bold ideas, emotionally resonant storytelling, revelatory research and experiments, and critical insights that together build a powerful field at the intersection of pop culture and social change.

To be considered, proposals must engage, impact and/or support at least one or all of our multi-community focus areas –people of color, immigrants, refugees and Muslims. Intersectional focus on gender equity, the rights of children and families, LGBT rights, disability, democratic fairness, and economic justice within these four community areas is also supported.

Eligibility:

Individuals/organizations with fiscal sponsorships, non-profit and for-profits are eligible.

Available Funding:

Our funding ranges from $5,000 for small, experimental initiatives to $200,000 for multi-year culture change initiatives.

Link to Full RFP:

http://popcollab.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/PCC-Major-Grants-Overview-1.pdf

The Berlin Prize Application

Sponsor:

The American Academy in Berlin

Deadline:

September 29, 2017 (12 noon EST)

Summary:

The Academy seeks to enrich transatlantic dialogue in the arts, humanities, and public policy through the development and communication of projects of the highest scholarly merit. For 2018-19, the Academy is also interested in considering projects that address the themes of migration and social integration, as well as questions of race in comparative perspective.

For all projects, the Academy asks that candidates explain the relevance of a stay in Berlin to the development of their work.

Eligibility:

Fellowships are restricted to US residents. US citizenship is not required. Candidates in academic disciplines must have completed a PhD at the time of application. Candidates working in other fields—such as journalism, film, law, or public policy—must have equivalent professional degrees. Writers should have published at least one book at the time of application.

Available Funding:

Fellowship benefits include round-trip airfare, housing at the Hans Arnhold Center, partial board, and a stipend of $5,000 per month. Fellows are expected to be in residence at the Academy during the entire term of the award, generally one academic semester.

Link to Full RFP:

Apply for a Fellowship

The National Academy of Education/Spencer Dissertation Fellowship Program

Sponsor:

The National Academy of Education (NAEd)/Spencer Foundation

Deadline:

5 PM Eastern Time, Thursday, October 5, 2017.

Summary:

Through the dissertation fellowship, the National Academy of Education (NAEd) and Spencer seek to encourage a new generation of scholars from a variety of fields to undertake research relevant to the improvement of education. The NAEd and Spencer believe scholarly insight from many different disciplines can contribute to an understanding of education as a fundamental human endeavor and advance our ability to address significant current issues in education. Therefore, the NAEd/Spencer Dissertation Fellowship supports individuals whose dissertations show potential for bringing fresh and constructive perspectives to the history, theory, or practice of formal or informal education anywhere in the world.

Although the dissertation topic must centrally concern education, graduate study may be in any academic discipline or professional field. Fellowships have been awarded to candidates in anthropology, architecture, art history, communications, economics, education, history, linguistics, literature, philosophy, political science, psychology, public health, religion, and sociology. Eligibility is not restricted to these academic areas. Candidates should be interested in pursuing research on education once the doctorate is attained.

Eligibility:

Applicants need not be citizens of the United States; however, they must be candidates for a doctoral degree at a graduate institution within the U.S. The fellowship is not intended to finance data collection or the completion of doctoral coursework but rather to support the final analysis of the research topic and the writing of the dissertation. For this reason, all applicants must confirm via the online application that they will have completed all pre-dissertation requirements by June 1, 2018 and must provide a clear and specific plan for completing the dissertation within a one or two-year time frame.

Available Funding:

Up to 35 non-renewable fellowships will be awarded. Recipients of the fellowships will receive $27,500 to support completion of the dissertation. This amount must be expended within a time limit of up to two years and in accordance with the work plan provided by the candidate.

Link to Full RFP:

NAEd/Spencer Dissertation Fellowship Program Guidelines

Collaborative Research Grants

Sponsor:

National Endowment for the Humanties

Deadline:

December 9, 2015

Summary:

Collaborative Research Grants support interpretive humanities research undertaken by a team of two or more scholars, for full-time or part-time activities for periods of one to three years. Support is available for various combinations of scholars, consultants, and research assistants; project-related travel; field work; applications of information technology; and technical support and services. All grantees are expected to communicate the results of their work to the appropriate scholarly and public audiences.

Eligibility:

The Collaborative Research program accepts applications from both institutions and individuals without an institutional affiliation (who may apply as unaffiliated project directors). Note that all projects must include at least one other staff member in addition to the project director.

Available Funding:

Awards are made for one to three years and normally range from an average of $25,000 to $100,000 per year. Awards for conferences are typically made for a minimum of one year and normally range from $15,000 to $65,000 per grant. Indirect costs (if any) are included in the awarded amount. Successful applicants will be awarded a grant in outright funds, matching funds, or a combination of the two, depending on the applicant’s preference and the availability of funds. The use of federal matching funds is encouraged. Federal matching funds are released on a one-to-one basis when a grantee secures gift funds from eligible third parties.

Link to Full RFP:

http://www.neh.gov/grants/research/collaborative-research-grants

Scholarly Editions and Translations Grants

Sponsor:

National Endowment for the Humanties

Deadline:

December 9, 2015

Summary:

Scholarly Editions and Translations grants support the preparation of editions and translations of pre-existing texts and documents of value to the humanities that are currently inaccessible or available in inadequate editions. Typically, the texts and documents are significant literary, philosophical, and historical materials; but other types of work, such as musical notation, are also eligible.

Projects must be undertaken by a team of at least one editor or translator and one other staff member. These grants support full-time or part-time activities for periods of one to three years.

Translation projects should also explain the approach adopted for the particular work to be translated. Editions and translations produced with NEH support contain scholarly and critical apparatus appropriate to the subject matter and format of the edition. This usually means introductions and annotations that provide essential information about the form, transmission, and historical and intellectual context of the texts and documents involved.

Proposals for editions of foreign language materials in the original language are eligible for funding, as well as proposals for editions of translated materials.

Eligibility:

The Scholarly Editions and Translations program accepts applications from both institutions and individuals without an institutional affiliation (who may apply as unaffiliated project directors). Note that all projects must include at least one other staff member in addition to the project director.

Available Funding:

Awards are made for one to three years. Awards usually range from an average of $50,000 to $100,000 per year.

Link to Full RFP:

http://www.neh.gov/grants/research/scholarly-editions-and-translations-grants

Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Sponsor:

National Endowment for the Humanties

Deadline:

September 16, 2015

Summary:

The Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants program awards relatively small grants to support the planning stages of innovative projects that promise to benefit the humanities.Proposals should be for the planning or initial stages of digital initiatives in any area of the humanities.

Innovation is a hallmark of this grant category, which incorporates the “high risk/high reward” paradigm often used by funding agencies in the sciences. NEH is requesting proposals for projects that take some risks in the pursuit of innovation and excellence.

Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants should result in plans, prototypes, or proofs of concept for long-term digital humanities projects prior to implementation.

Eligibility:

Eligibility is limited to  U.S. nonprofit organizations or institutions with IRS tax-exempt status and state and local governmental agencies and federally recognized Indian tribal organizations. Individuals are not eligible to apply.

Available Funding:

Not Indicated

Link to Full RFP:

http://www.neh.gov/files/grants/digital-humanities-start-sept-11-2014.pdf

Documenting Endangered Languages

Sponsor:

National Endowment for the Humanties

Deadline:

September 15, 2015

Summary:

The Documenting Endangered Languages (DEL) program is a partnership between the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) to develop and advance knowledge concerning endangered human languages. Made urgent by the imminent death of an estimated half of the 6000-7000 currently used languages, this effort aims also to exploit advances in information technology. Awards support fieldwork and other activities relevant to recording, documenting, and archiving endangered languages, including the preparation of lexicons, grammars, text samples, and databases. DEL funding is available in the form of one- to three-year project grants as well as fellowships for six to twelve months. At least half the available funding will be awarded to projects involving fieldwork.

Eligibility:

Proposals may only be submitted by the following: Universities and Colleges – Universities and two- and four-year colleges (including community colleges) accredited in, and having a campus located in, the US acting on behalf of their faculty members. Such organizations also are referred to as academic institutions. Non-profit, non-academic organizations: Independent museums, observatories, research labs, professional societies and similar organizations in the U.S. associated with educational or research activities. Unaffiliated Individuals: Scientists, engineers or educators in the U.S. who are U.S. citizens. Tribal organizations and other American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian serving organizations. For DOCTORAL DISSERTATION RESEARCH IMPROVEMENT GRANTS, proposals may only be submitted by the following: Universities and Colleges – Ph.D. granting universities and colleges accredited in, and having a campus located in, the U.S. acting on behalf of their faculty members. Such organizations are also referred to as academic institutions.

Available Funding:

$4,000,000 Approximately 4 million (approximately $3 million from NSF and $1 million from NEH), this is the total for awards to be made annually pending availability of funds.

Link to Full RFP:

http://www.neh.gov/grants/preservation/documenting-endangered-languages

Enduring Questions

Sponsor:

National Endowment for the Humanties

Deadline:

September 10, 2015

Summary:

The NEH Enduring Questions grant program supports faculty members in the preparation of a new course on a fundamental concern of human life as addressed by the humanities. This question-driven course would encourage undergraduates and teachers to join together in a deep and sustained program of reading in order to encounter influential ideas, works, and thinkers over the centuries.

The course is to be developed by one or more (up to four) faculty members at a single institution, but not team taught. Enduring Questions courses must be taught from a common syllabus and must be offered during the grant period at least twice by each faculty member involved in developing the course. The grant supports the work of faculty members in designing, preparing, and assessing the new course. It may also be used for ancillary activities that enhance faculty-student intellectual community, such as visits to museums and artistic or cultural events. An Enduring Questions course may be taught by faculty from any department or discipline in the humanities or by faculty outside the humanities (for example, astronomy, biology, economics, law, mathematics, medicine, or psychology), so long as humanities sources are central to the course.

Eligibility:

Any U.S. nonprofit two- or four-year college or university with IRS tax-exempt status is eligible. Individuals are not eligible to apply.

Available Funding:

NEH Enduring Questions grants can provide up to $38,000 in outright funds for projects serving a single institution. The size of the maximum award depends on the number of faculty involved in developing the course. For a course developed by a single faculty member, the maximum award is $22,000; for a course developed by two faculty members, the maximum award is $33,000; for a course developed by three or four faculty members, the maximum award is $38,000.

Link to Full RFP:

http://www.neh.gov/files/grants/enduring-questions-sept-11-2014.pdf

Media Projects: Production Grants

Sponsor:

National Endowment for the Humanties

Deadline:

August 12, 2015

Summary:

NEH’s Division of Public Programs supports activities that engage millions of Americans in understanding significant humanities works and ideas. At the center of every NEH-funded public humanities project is a core set of humanities ideas developed by scholars, matched to imaginative formats that bring those ideas to life for people of all ages and all walks of life. Projects must be analytical and deeply grounded in humanities scholarship in a discipline such as history, religion, anthropology, jurisprudence, or art history. NEH is a national funding agency, so the projects we support must demonstrate the potential to attract a broad, general audience. We welcome humanities projects tailored to particular groups, such as families, youth (including K-12 students), teachers, seniors, at-risk communities, and veterans, but they should also strive to cultivate a more inclusive audience.

Media Projects grants support the following formats:

  • film and television projects; and
  • radio projects.

NEH encourages projects that engage public audiences through multiple formats in the exploration of humanities ideas. Proposed projects might include complementary components to a film, television, or radio project. These components should deepen the audience’s understanding of the subject in a supplementary manner: for example, book/film discussion programs, websites, mobile applications, museum exhibitions, or podcasts.

Eligibility:

Any U.S. nonprofit organization with IRS tax-exempt status is eligible, as are state and local governmental agencies and federally recognized Indian tribal governments. Individuals are not eligible to apply. Independent producers who wish to apply for NEH funding must seek an eligible organization to sponsor the project and submit the application to NEH. Under this arrangement the sponsoring organization is considered the grantee of record and assumes all attendant responsibilities of a grantee organization.

Available Funding:

Awards last for one to three years and may range from $100,000 to $650,000. In rare circumstances, Chairman’s Special Awards of up to $1 million are available for projects that will reach an exceptionally large audience.

Link to Full RFP:

http://www.neh.gov/files/grants/media-projects-production-jan-14-2015.pdf

Media Projects: Development Grants

Sponsor:

National Endowment for the Humanties

Deadline:

August 12, 2015

Summary:

NEH’s Division of Public Programs supports activities that engage millions of Americans in understanding significant humanities works and ideas. At the center of every NEH-funded public humanities project is a core set of humanities ideas developed by scholars, matched to imaginative formats that bring those ideas to life for people of all ages and all walks of life. Projects must be analytical and deeply grounded in humanities scholarship in a discipline such as history, religion, anthropology, jurisprudence, or art history. NEH is a national funding agency, so the projects we support must demonstrate the potential to attract a broad, general audience. We welcome humanities projects tailored to particular groups, such as families, youth (including K-12 students), teachers, seniors, at-risk communities, and veterans, but they should also strive to cultivate a more inclusive audience.

Media Projects grants support the following formats:

  • film and television projects; and
  • radio projects.

NEH encourages projects that engage public audiences through multiple formats in the exploration of humanities ideas. Proposed projects might include complementary components to a film, television, or radio project. These components should deepen the audience’s understanding of the subject in a supplementary manner: for example, book/film discussion programs, websites, mobile applications, museum exhibitions, or podcasts.

Eligibility:

Any U.S. nonprofit organization with IRS tax-exempt status is eligible, as are state and local governmental agencies and federally recognized Indian tribal governments. Individuals are not eligible to apply. Independent producers who wish to apply for NEH funding must seek an eligible organization to sponsor the project and submit the application to NEH. Under this arrangement the sponsoring organization is considered the grantee of record and assumes all attendant responsibilities of a grantee organization.

Available Funding:

Awards for development typically range from $40,000 to $75,000, depending on the complexity of the project, and are usually made for a period of six to twelve months.

Link to Full RFP:

http://www.neh.gov/grants/preservation/humanities-collections-and-reference-resources