Cyberlearning for Work at the Human-Technology Frontier (NSF 17-598)

Sponsor:

National Science Foundation

Deadline:

January 8, 2018 (Second Monday in January, annually thereafter)

Summary:

The Cyberlearning for Work at the Human-Technology Frontier program supports learning technology (or cyberlearning) research that integrates both learning and technological goals to enable radical improvements in learning within educational and work environments. Cyberlearning research in this program should be informed by the convergence of multiple disciplines: education and learning sciences, computer and information science and engineering, and cognitive, behavioral and social sciences.

This program solicits projects that are exploratory and experimental in nature. These projects should explore proof-of-concept or feasibility of a novel or innovative learning technology. We encourage projects that try out new ideas, especially risky ones.

A primary goal of the program is to investigate innovative technologies for STEM learning and teaching within the educational and work settings, to include pervasive lifelong learning with technology. Within this program, the scope of projects span across:

  • Content area: STEM and other foundational areas supported by NSF that enable STEM learning (e.g., self-regulation, literacy, communication, collaboration and social skills).
  • Population and context: learners, teachers and workers in formal or informal settings (e.g., workplace, online, classroom, museums); and individual, collective, and collaborative learning across the lifespan.

In the context of work, we encourage projects that: (1) design and develop future learning environments to educate or re-educate workers for new work environments and experiences in collaboration with advanced technology; (2) develop relevant formal and informal learning experiences as well as just-in-time training on the job; (3) support the needs of diverse workers from a broad set of backgrounds and experiences; and (4) support the future work of teachers in classrooms and other related settings.

All projects must address a learning need or opportunity within the educational or work context and must have integrated learning and technology goals (see below), convergent with the computer and information sciences, engineering, and/or social sciences. Innovative technologies can reshape learning processes, which in turn can influence new technology design.

Eligibility:

 Limit on Number of Proposals per PI or Co-PI: 2

  • An individual may participate as PI or co-PI in no more than a total of two (2) proposals in response to this solicitation. In the event that an individual exceeds the limit for this solicitation, proposals received within the limit will be accepted based on earliest date and time of proposal submission (i.e. the first two proposals received will be accepted and the remainder will be returned without review). No exceptions will be made.

Available Funding:

Estimated Number of Awards: 20

Each project will be funded for a duration of 2 to 3 years and up to a total funding amount of $750,000.

Link to Full RFP:

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17598/nsf17598.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

Leading Engineering for America’s Prosperity, Health, and Infrastructure (LEAP HI) (NSF 17-602)

Sponsor:

National Science Foundation

Deadline:

  • Letter of Intent (LOI) required: December 15, 2017; July 16, 2018 (July 15 annually thereafter)
  • Full Proposal:  February 20, 2018; September 17, 2018 (September 15 annually thereafter)

Summary:

 The LEAP HI program challenges the engineering research community to take a leadership role in addressing demanding, urgent, and consequential challenges for advancing America’s prosperity, health and infrastructure. LEAP HI proposals confront engineering problems that are too complex to yield to the efforts of a single investigator — problems that require sustained and coordinated effort from interdisciplinary research teams, with goals that are not achievable through a series of smaller, short-term projects. LEAP HI projects perform fundamental research that may lead to disruptive technologies and methods, lay the foundation for new and strengthened industries, enable notable improvements in quality of life, or re-imagine and revitalize the built environment.

  • LEAP HI supports fundamental research projects involving collaborating investigators, of duration up to five years, with total budget between $1 million and $2 million.
  • LEAP HI proposals must articulate a fundamental research problem with compelling intellectual challenge and significant societal impact, particularly on economic competitiveness, quality of life, public health, or essential infrastructure. One or more CMMI core topics must lie at the heart of the proposal, and integration of disciplinary expertise not typically engaged in CMMI-funded projects is encouraged.
  • LEAP HI proposals must highlight engineering research in a leadership role.
  • LEAP HI proposals must demonstrate the need for a sustained research effort by an integrated, interdisciplinary team, and should include a research integration plan and timeline for research activities, with convincing mechanisms for frequent and effective communication.

Eligibility:

  • Who May Submit Proposals:

Proposals may only be submitted by the following:

  1. Universities and Colleges – Universities and two- and four-year colleges (including community colleges) accredited in, and having a campus located in, the US acting on behalf of their faculty members. Such organizations also are referred to as academic institutions.
  2. Non-profit, non-academic organizations: Independent museums, observatories, research labs, professional societies and similar organizations in the U.S. associated with educational or research activities.
  • Who May Serve as PI:

PIs, co-PIs, or other senior project personnel must hold primary, full-time, paid appointments in research or teaching positions at US-based campuses/offices of eligible organizations.

  • Limit on Number of Proposals per Organization:

There are no restrictions or limits.

  • Limit on Number of Proposals per PI or Co-PI: 1

No individual may be a PI, CoPI, or Senior Investigator on more than one LEAP HI proposal in a given year. Please be advised that if an individual’s name appears, in any of the above-mentioned capacities, on more than ONE proposal, all submittals after the first proposal (based on time-stamp) will be returned without review. No exceptions will be made.

Available Funding:

  • Estimated Number of Awards: 4 to 7 will be made each year.
  • Anticipated Funding Amount: $6,500,000 to $7,500,000

Estimated program budget, number of awards, and average award size/duration are subject to the availability of funds.

Link to Full RFP:

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17602/nsf17602.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

Research on the Health of Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Populations (R01) (PA-17-478)

Sponsor:

National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Deadline:

Application Due Date(s): New Date Standard dates apply.

AIDS Application Due Date(s): New Date Standard AIDS dates apply.
Summary:

This FOA calls for research addressing the medical, sociological, psychological and structural causes and consequences of transgender and gender nonconforming identities. Investigations of the social determinants of health in these populations are needed, including understanding the impact of stigma, the high impact of HIV, minority stress, education, employment, violence, homelessness, and incarceration. More information is needed on relationships with partners and family, as well as on sexual and reproductive health. Successful aging, including the impact of life events, experiences, and interventions such as hormone therapy and surgery are other important topics to investigate. It will also be important to learn more about brain development, resilience, and end-of-life issues. Collaborative, cross disciplinary work will be essential. Areas of research sought include but are not limited to:

  • Improved Methodology and Measurement
  • Development of Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Identities
  • Improvements in Diagnosis and Clinical Management of Gender Dysphoria
  • Health Outcomes of Long-term Hormone Use and Surgical Treatment
  • Quality of Life and Mental Health

Please review the full RFP below where more details are available.

Eligibility:

Any individual(s) with the skills, knowledge, and resources necessary to carry out the proposed research as the Program Director(s)/Principal Investigator(s) (PD(s)/PI(s)) is invited to work with his/her organization to develop an application for support. Individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups as well as individuals with disabilities are always encouraged to apply for NIH support.

Available Funding:

Application budgets are not limited but need to reflect the actual needs of the proposed project. The maximum project period is 5 years.

Link to Full RFP:

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-17-478.html

Department of Defense Orthotics and Prosthetics Outcomes Research Program (OPORP) FY17

Sponsor:

U.S. Department of Defense Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP)

Deadline:

Pre-Application: 5PM EST October 20, 2017

Application (invitation to apply): 11:59PM EST January 8, 2018

Summary:

The FY17 Defense Appropriations Act provides $10 million (M) to the Department of Defense Orthotics and Prosthetics Outcomes Research Program (OPORP) to support research that evaluates the comparative effectiveness of orthotic and prosthetic clinical interventions using patient-centric outcomes for Service members and Veterans who have undergone limb amputation.  As directed by the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, the Defense Health Agency (DHA) J9, Research and Development Directorate manages the Defense Health Program (DHP) Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E) appropriation. The managing agent for the anticipated Program Announcements/Funding Opportunities is the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP).

Focus Areas:  The OPORP will only consider applications that specifically address the critical needs of the Orthotics and Prosthetics Outcomes research community in one or more of the FY17 Focus Areas.  The OPORP will solicit research applications that address at least one of the following FY17 Focus Areas:

  • Orthotic or Prosthetic Device Form:  Analysis of variables related to currently available clinical options such as, but not limited to, device size, shape, material, and configuration.
  • Orthotic or Prosthetic Device Fit:  Analysis of currently available clinical options that facilitate device fit-related characteristics such as comfort and usability through variables such as human-device interface and component connection.
  • Orthotic or Prosthetic Device Function:  Analysis of the variables related to currently available clinical options such as device control, passive response, active/actuated response, power, sensors, overall performance with respect to activities of daily living and other real-world activities.

The OPORA is focused on outcomes-based best practices through analysis of the merits of prosthetic and orthotic device options currently available, not on the development of new, or the improvement of existing, technology.  The intent of the award is to generate clinically useful evidence that will enhance and optimize patient outcomes.

Animal studies are not allowed.

Eligibility:

Funding Level 1/New Investigators:  Investigators that meet the following criteria at the application submission deadline date:

  • Are within 5 years of their last training position
  • Are able to demonstrate the freedom to pursue research goals outside of a formal mentorship program or arrangement
  • Can provide evidence of organizational support, such as start-up funds provided by the institution and/or use of a technician, space, facilities, and resources
  • PIs working within a laboratory team are eligible to apply for this award, provided they meet the criteria above.
  • Graduate students and postdoctoral fellows are not eligible for this award.

Funding Level 2:  Independent investigators at all academic levels (or equivalent) are eligible to submit applications.

Funding Level 1/New Investigator Option may support pilot research or research that is already supported by preliminary data and has the potential to make significant advancements toward clinical translation.

Funding Level 2 Option is supported by preliminary data and has the potential to make significant advancement towards clinical translation.

Available Funding:

Funding Level 1/ New Investigators:

·       Maximum funding of $500,000 for total costs.

·       Maximum period of performance is 3 years.

Funding Level 2:

·       Maximum funding of $2.5M for total costs.

·       Maximum period of performance is 4 years.

Link to Full RFP:

http://cdmrp.army.mil/funding/pa/FY17-OPORP-OPORA.pdf

CTSI’s Research Team Building Consultation Service

Sponsor:

NYU Langone Medical Center’s Clinical and Translation Science Institute

Deadline:

Rolling, but space is limited.

Summary:

The Research Team Building Consultation Service, funded through NYULMC’s CTSI mentoring program, was designed to help investigators at various stages (post docs through more senior investigators) build or enhance their team to improve research productivity while providing mentoring and training to the next generation of scholars, particularly those underrepresented in science. We help faculty/post docs build labs, design teams, and recruit over a 12-month period.

Eligibility:

No additional eligibility restrictions.

Available Funding:

Not applicable. The service will provide 15 hours of individual consultation for each investigator.

Link to Full RFP:

CTSI July 2017 Newsletter

Heineken Prizes 2018

Sponsor:

Dr H.P. Heineken Foundation and the Alfred Heineken Fondsen Foundation. The selection of the prizes is entrusted by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Deadline:

October 15, 2017

Summary:

The Heineken Prizes are intended explicitly for scientists and scholars who are currently active in their field and whose research still holds considerable promise for future innovative discoveries. International juries will select the winners.

Eligibility:

Prizes are available in the following fields:

Available Funding:

$200,000

Link to Full RFP:

http://www.knaw.nl/en/awards/awards/heinekenprizes/heinekenprijs-voor-de-milieuwetenschappen

Parkinson’s Research Program (PRP) – Investigator-Initiated Research Award (IIRA)

Sponsor:

U.S Department of Defense Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP)

Deadline:

Pre-application: 5 PM EST, August 17, 2017

Application: 11:59 PM EST, August 31, 2017

Summary:

The PRP Investigator-Initiated Research Award (IIRA) mechanism is being offered for the first time in FY17. The PRP Investigator-Initiated Research Award supports highly rigorous, high-impact research projects that have the potential to make an important contribution to Parkinson’s disease research and/or patient care. This award mechanism supports the full spectrum of research from basic science through clinical research that specifically focuses on scientific and clinical Parkinson’s disease issues, which, if successfully addressed, have the potential to make a major impact in understanding, preventing, diagnosing, or treating Parkinson’s disease or enhancing the well-being of individuals experiencing the impact of the disease.
Consistent with the mission of the FY17 PRP to support research to understand, prevent, diagnose, and treat Parkinson’s disease in patients, including Service members and Veterans, investigators are required to address at least one of the following FY17 PRP Focus Areas:
  1. Mechanisms of neuroplasticity in the Parkinson’s disease brain.
  2. Studies to identify gene-environment interactions in Parkinson’s disease cohorts (applications addressing this focus area have an additional submission requirement; please see RFP.
  3. Pathophysiological implications of tau protein in Parkinson’s disease.

Eligibility:

Independent investigators at or above the level of Assistant Professor (or equivalent) are eligible to submit an application as an Initiating or Partnering PI.
Preliminary data to support feasibility are encouraged. Any unpublished, preliminary data provided should originate from the laboratory of the PI or a member(s) of the research team. The preliminary data must support the feasibility of the study.
Partnering PI Option: The Investigator-Initiated Research Award mechanism includes an option for up to three PIs. One PI will be identified as the Initiating PI and will be responsible for the majority of the administrative tasks associated with application submission. The other PI(s) (maximum of two) will be identified as a Partnering PI(s). Initiating and Partnering PIs each have different submission requirements, please see full RFP.
Available Funding:
  • Single PI:  The anticipated total costs budgeted for the entire period of performance for an FY17 PRP IIRA will not exceed $1M.  The maximum period of performance is three (3) years.
  • Multi PI: The anticipated total costs budgeted for the entire period of performance for an FY17 PRP IIRA will not exceed $2.5M. The maximum period of performance is four (4) years.

Link to Full RFP:

http://cdmrp.army.mil/funding/pa/FY17-PRP-IIRA.pdf

Parkinson’s Research Program (PRP) – Early Investigator Research Award

Sponsor:

U.S Department of Defense Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP)

Deadline:

Pre-application: 5 PM EST, August 17, 2017

Application: 11:59 PM EST, August 31, 2017

Summary:

The PRP Early Investigator Research Award (EIRA) mechanism is being offered for the first
time in FY17. The PRP Early Investigator Research Award supports Parkinson’s disease-focused research opportunities for individuals in the early stages of their careers, under the guidance of a designated Mentor.
Consistent with the mission of the FY17 PRP to support research to understand, prevent,
diagnose, and treat Parkinson’s disease in patients, including Service members and Veterans,
investigators are required to address at least one of the following FY17 PRP Focus Areas:
  1. Mechanisms of neuroplasticity in the Parkinson’s disease brain.
  2. Studies to identify gene-environment interactions in Parkinson’s disease cohorts (applications addressing this focus area have an additional submission requirement; please see RFP.
  3. Pathophysiological implications of tau protein in Parkinson’s disease.

 

Eligibility:

 The Early Investigator is considered the Principal Investigator (PI) of the application and must exhibit strong potential for, and commitment to, pursuing a career as an investigator at the forefront of Parkinson’s disease research; however, the PI is not required to have previous Parkinson’s disease research experience. Clinical fellows applying to the PRP EIRA mechanism should be specializing in movement disorders.

The investigator must be a postdoctoral or clinical fellow within three years of advanced degree or residency training (or equivalent) as of the application deadline

Applications must include at least one Mentor, appropriate to the proposed research project, who has experience in Parkinson’s disease research and mentoring as demonstrated by a record of active funding, recent publications, and successful mentorship. The selected Mentor(s) should also demonstrate a clear commitment to the development of the PI toward independence as a Parkinson’s disease researcher.

Available Funding:

The anticipated total (direct plus indirect) costs budgeted for the entire period of performance will not exceed $321,000. The maximum period of performance is two (2) years. The PRP’s FY17 appropriation is $16M.

Link to Full RFP:

http://cdmrp.army.mil/funding/pa/FY17-PRP-EIRA.pdf

Integration of Individual Residential Histories into Cancer Research (R21) PA-17-295 and (R01) PA-17-298

Sponsor:

NIH / NCI

Deadline:

Standard R01 dates apply

Standard R21 dates apply

Summary:

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to support substantive investigation of the role of individual residential histories in cancer etiology and outcomes, and to encourage the development of complex analytical strategies in support of substantive investigation.

There is a growing recognition of the importance of residential histories – a record of an individual’s places of residence across his or her lifetime — in cancer research, as part of evolving cancer data ecosystem.  Residential history encapsulates a person’s multiple interactions with the social and physical environment that can result in lasting health impact and is an important factor in assessing the effects of exposures on disease onset, as demonstrated in focused studies.  Lifetime residential history records can reveal the variety of potential and actual exposures throughout person’s life including, but not limited to: neighborhood characteristics, physical conditions of housing, tobacco and alcohol consumption, food environments, chemical exposures to contaminants in water, soil, and air, accessibility to healthcare resources, and health disparities.

This FOA is expected to engage scientists from a range of disciplines, including epidemiology, statistics, geospatial science, computer science, demography, decision science, and behavioral science, to effectively integrate individual residential histories into cancer research.

Geospatial expertise is essential for generating new knowledge about the residential context relative to cancer risk, etiology, prevention, treatment, and outcomes. Computer science and informatics are crucial for the development of methodology that would ensure more precise matching of residential information and location (geocoding), improve linkage to automated data sources, and generate reliable lifetime residential histories. Cancer surveillance science, in conjunction with statistical, epidemiological, and medical expertise, is extremely important in answering substantial questions related to the use of lifetime residential histories in the analysis of cancer risk and cancer burden.

In addition, a combination of scientific expertise in demography and behavioral science in addressing the role of lifetime residential histories in the context of cancer can help facilitate more precise assessment of cancer disparities.

Eligibility:

N/A

Available Funding:

R01: Application budgets are not limited but need to reflect the actual needs of the proposed project. The maximum project period is 5 years.

R21: The combined budget for direct costs for the two-year project period may not exceed $275,000. No more than $200,000 may be requested in a single year. The maximum project period is 2 years.

Link to Full RFP:

R01https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-17-298.html

R21https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-17-295.html

Centers for Chemical Innovation – Phase I (CCI) (NSF 17-564)

Sponsor:

National Science Foundation

Deadline:

Preliminary Proposals: September 12, 2017

Full Proposals (by invitation only): March 06, 2018

Summary:

The Centers for Chemical Innovation (CCI) Program supports research centers focused on major, long-term fundamental chemical research challenges. CCIs are agile structures that respond rapidly to emerging opportunities, promote synergy, enhance collaborations, and engage in potentially transformative research. CCIs integrate research, innovation, education, broadening participation, and informal science communication.

The FY 2018 Phase I CCI competition is open to projects in all fields supported by the Division of Chemistry. Successful proposals will have a clear chemistry focus and the potential for transformative impact in chemistry. The Division of Chemistry particularly encourages CCI centers or projects within centers aligned with Data-Driven Discovery Science in Chemistry (D3SC). Such CCI projects would seek new chemical understanding through sharing, mining and repurposing of chemical datasets and through the use of state-of-the-art data analysis techniques. Additional context for D3SC and links to related documents can be found at NSF 17-036.

The research activities may build on pre-existing efforts, but new, collaborative results attributed to the CCI award are expected. The Phase I award will also develop broader impact activities in the four required areas (see below), including piloting and developing center-scale activities commensurate with a Phase II CCI. Center development includes the development of a strategic plan covering all aspects of a CCI (see full RFP).

CCIs are expected to integrate their research with activities that broaden the impact of their research. A Phase I team might pilot activities in these areas:

  • Innovation – translation or transfer of basic research results into economic or societal benefit. This element includes intellectual property protection and a proactive plan to either engage industry in technology transfer or to commercialize technology in other ways.
  • Higher Education and Professional Development – education and professional development for undergraduate and graduate students supported by the grant, including co-mentorship or other collaborative training and continued professional development and mentoring for postdoctoral research associates. This may also include education in various aspects of innovation (intellectual property, entrepreneurship, etc.) and other higher education activities (i.e., new course materials or curricula).
  • Broadening the participation of underrepresented groups – CCI goals for increasing engagement by underrepresented groups, plans for reaching those goals, and an evaluation strategy.
  • Informal science communication – plans for communicating the CCI research to public audiences and possible ways to evaluate the impact of these outreach efforts.

Eligibility:

Who May Serve as PI:

  • While these proposals will reflect the research of many investigators, only the name of the Principal Investigator (PI) should appear on the cover sheet. All other investigators are considered Faculty Associates (non-coPI senior personnel). An investigator may participate (as PI or Faculty Associate) in only one CCI preliminary proposal and one CCI full proposal (Phase I or Phase II) submitted to this competition. The PI must be affiliated with an eligible submitting organization.

Limit on Number of Proposals per PI or Co-PI: 1

  • An investigator may participate (as PI or Faculty Associate) in only one preliminary proposal and one full proposal (Phase I or Phase II) submitted in response to this solicitation. The PI must be affiliated with an eligible submitting organization.

The team of investigators for a Phase I proposal must include at least four senior researchers with complementary expertise. While there is no upper limit on the number of Phase I investigators, proposers are cautioned to avoid teams that are too large to collaborate effectively. The available resources should also be carefully considered in assembling the team. CCIs may partner with researchers from industry, national laboratories and international organizations. See detailed guidance below for non-U.S. or non-academic researchers.

Available Funding:

NSF anticipates making three new Phase I awards (up to $1,800,000 for 3 years) as standard or continuing grants.

Link to Full RFP:

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17564/nsf17564.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click#elig