CTSI’s Research Team Building Consultation Service

Sponsor:

NYU Langone Medical Center’s Clinical and Translation Science Institute

Deadline:

Rolling, but space is limited.

Summary:

The Research Team Building Consultation Service, funded through NYULMC’s CTSI mentoring program, was designed to help investigators at various stages (post docs through more senior investigators) build or enhance their team to improve research productivity while providing mentoring and training to the next generation of scholars, particularly those underrepresented in science. We help faculty/post docs build labs, design teams, and recruit over a 12-month period.

Eligibility:

No additional eligibility restrictions.

Available Funding:

Not applicable. The service will provide 15 hours of individual consultation for each investigator.

Link to Full RFP:

CTSI July 2017 Newsletter

Heineken Prizes 2018

Sponsor:

Dr H.P. Heineken Foundation and the Alfred Heineken Fondsen Foundation. The selection of the prizes is entrusted by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Deadline:

October 15, 2017

Summary:

The Heineken Prizes are intended explicitly for scientists and scholars who are currently active in their field and whose research still holds considerable promise for future innovative discoveries. International juries will select the winners.

Eligibility:

Prizes are available in the following fields:

Available Funding:

$200,000

Link to Full RFP:

http://www.knaw.nl/en/awards/awards/heinekenprizes/heinekenprijs-voor-de-milieuwetenschappen

Parkinson’s Research Program (PRP) – Investigator-Initiated Research Award (IIRA)

Sponsor:

U.S Department of Defense Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP)

Deadline:

Pre-application: 5 PM EST, August 17, 2017

Application: 11:59 PM EST, August 31, 2017

Summary:

The PRP Investigator-Initiated Research Award (IIRA) mechanism is being offered for the first time in FY17. The PRP Investigator-Initiated Research Award supports highly rigorous, high-impact research projects that have the potential to make an important contribution to Parkinson’s disease research and/or patient care. This award mechanism supports the full spectrum of research from basic science through clinical research that specifically focuses on scientific and clinical Parkinson’s disease issues, which, if successfully addressed, have the potential to make a major impact in understanding, preventing, diagnosing, or treating Parkinson’s disease or enhancing the well-being of individuals experiencing the impact of the disease.
Consistent with the mission of the FY17 PRP to support research to understand, prevent, diagnose, and treat Parkinson’s disease in patients, including Service members and Veterans, investigators are required to address at least one of the following FY17 PRP Focus Areas:
  1. Mechanisms of neuroplasticity in the Parkinson’s disease brain.
  2. Studies to identify gene-environment interactions in Parkinson’s disease cohorts (applications addressing this focus area have an additional submission requirement; please see RFP.
  3. Pathophysiological implications of tau protein in Parkinson’s disease.

Eligibility:

Independent investigators at or above the level of Assistant Professor (or equivalent) are eligible to submit an application as an Initiating or Partnering PI.
Preliminary data to support feasibility are encouraged. Any unpublished, preliminary data provided should originate from the laboratory of the PI or a member(s) of the research team. The preliminary data must support the feasibility of the study.
Partnering PI Option: The Investigator-Initiated Research Award mechanism includes an option for up to three PIs. One PI will be identified as the Initiating PI and will be responsible for the majority of the administrative tasks associated with application submission. The other PI(s) (maximum of two) will be identified as a Partnering PI(s). Initiating and Partnering PIs each have different submission requirements, please see full RFP.
Available Funding:
  • Single PI:  The anticipated total costs budgeted for the entire period of performance for an FY17 PRP IIRA will not exceed $1M.  The maximum period of performance is three (3) years.
  • Multi PI: The anticipated total costs budgeted for the entire period of performance for an FY17 PRP IIRA will not exceed $2.5M. The maximum period of performance is four (4) years.

Link to Full RFP:

http://cdmrp.army.mil/funding/pa/FY17-PRP-IIRA.pdf

Parkinson’s Research Program (PRP) – Early Investigator Research Award

Sponsor:

U.S Department of Defense Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP)

Deadline:

Pre-application: 5 PM EST, August 17, 2017

Application: 11:59 PM EST, August 31, 2017

Summary:

The PRP Early Investigator Research Award (EIRA) mechanism is being offered for the first
time in FY17. The PRP Early Investigator Research Award supports Parkinson’s disease-focused research opportunities for individuals in the early stages of their careers, under the guidance of a designated Mentor.
Consistent with the mission of the FY17 PRP to support research to understand, prevent,
diagnose, and treat Parkinson’s disease in patients, including Service members and Veterans,
investigators are required to address at least one of the following FY17 PRP Focus Areas:
  1. Mechanisms of neuroplasticity in the Parkinson’s disease brain.
  2. Studies to identify gene-environment interactions in Parkinson’s disease cohorts (applications addressing this focus area have an additional submission requirement; please see RFP.
  3. Pathophysiological implications of tau protein in Parkinson’s disease.

 

Eligibility:

 The Early Investigator is considered the Principal Investigator (PI) of the application and must exhibit strong potential for, and commitment to, pursuing a career as an investigator at the forefront of Parkinson’s disease research; however, the PI is not required to have previous Parkinson’s disease research experience. Clinical fellows applying to the PRP EIRA mechanism should be specializing in movement disorders.

The investigator must be a postdoctoral or clinical fellow within three years of advanced degree or residency training (or equivalent) as of the application deadline

Applications must include at least one Mentor, appropriate to the proposed research project, who has experience in Parkinson’s disease research and mentoring as demonstrated by a record of active funding, recent publications, and successful mentorship. The selected Mentor(s) should also demonstrate a clear commitment to the development of the PI toward independence as a Parkinson’s disease researcher.

Available Funding:

The anticipated total (direct plus indirect) costs budgeted for the entire period of performance will not exceed $321,000. The maximum period of performance is two (2) years. The PRP’s FY17 appropriation is $16M.

Link to Full RFP:

http://cdmrp.army.mil/funding/pa/FY17-PRP-EIRA.pdf

Integration of Individual Residential Histories into Cancer Research (R21) PA-17-295 and (R01) PA-17-298

Sponsor:

NIH / NCI

Deadline:

Standard R01 dates apply

Standard R21 dates apply

Summary:

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to support substantive investigation of the role of individual residential histories in cancer etiology and outcomes, and to encourage the development of complex analytical strategies in support of substantive investigation.

There is a growing recognition of the importance of residential histories – a record of an individual’s places of residence across his or her lifetime — in cancer research, as part of evolving cancer data ecosystem.  Residential history encapsulates a person’s multiple interactions with the social and physical environment that can result in lasting health impact and is an important factor in assessing the effects of exposures on disease onset, as demonstrated in focused studies.  Lifetime residential history records can reveal the variety of potential and actual exposures throughout person’s life including, but not limited to: neighborhood characteristics, physical conditions of housing, tobacco and alcohol consumption, food environments, chemical exposures to contaminants in water, soil, and air, accessibility to healthcare resources, and health disparities.

This FOA is expected to engage scientists from a range of disciplines, including epidemiology, statistics, geospatial science, computer science, demography, decision science, and behavioral science, to effectively integrate individual residential histories into cancer research.

Geospatial expertise is essential for generating new knowledge about the residential context relative to cancer risk, etiology, prevention, treatment, and outcomes. Computer science and informatics are crucial for the development of methodology that would ensure more precise matching of residential information and location (geocoding), improve linkage to automated data sources, and generate reliable lifetime residential histories. Cancer surveillance science, in conjunction with statistical, epidemiological, and medical expertise, is extremely important in answering substantial questions related to the use of lifetime residential histories in the analysis of cancer risk and cancer burden.

In addition, a combination of scientific expertise in demography and behavioral science in addressing the role of lifetime residential histories in the context of cancer can help facilitate more precise assessment of cancer disparities.

Eligibility:

N/A

Available Funding:

R01: Application budgets are not limited but need to reflect the actual needs of the proposed project. The maximum project period is 5 years.

R21: The combined budget for direct costs for the two-year project period may not exceed $275,000. No more than $200,000 may be requested in a single year. The maximum project period is 2 years.

Link to Full RFP:

R01https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-17-298.html

R21https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-17-295.html

Centers for Chemical Innovation – Phase I (CCI) (NSF 17-564)

Sponsor:

National Science Foundation

Deadline:

Preliminary Proposals: September 12, 2017

Full Proposals (by invitation only): March 06, 2018

Summary:

The Centers for Chemical Innovation (CCI) Program supports research centers focused on major, long-term fundamental chemical research challenges. CCIs are agile structures that respond rapidly to emerging opportunities, promote synergy, enhance collaborations, and engage in potentially transformative research. CCIs integrate research, innovation, education, broadening participation, and informal science communication.

The FY 2018 Phase I CCI competition is open to projects in all fields supported by the Division of Chemistry. Successful proposals will have a clear chemistry focus and the potential for transformative impact in chemistry. The Division of Chemistry particularly encourages CCI centers or projects within centers aligned with Data-Driven Discovery Science in Chemistry (D3SC). Such CCI projects would seek new chemical understanding through sharing, mining and repurposing of chemical datasets and through the use of state-of-the-art data analysis techniques. Additional context for D3SC and links to related documents can be found at NSF 17-036.

The research activities may build on pre-existing efforts, but new, collaborative results attributed to the CCI award are expected. The Phase I award will also develop broader impact activities in the four required areas (see below), including piloting and developing center-scale activities commensurate with a Phase II CCI. Center development includes the development of a strategic plan covering all aspects of a CCI (see full RFP).

CCIs are expected to integrate their research with activities that broaden the impact of their research. A Phase I team might pilot activities in these areas:

  • Innovation – translation or transfer of basic research results into economic or societal benefit. This element includes intellectual property protection and a proactive plan to either engage industry in technology transfer or to commercialize technology in other ways.
  • Higher Education and Professional Development – education and professional development for undergraduate and graduate students supported by the grant, including co-mentorship or other collaborative training and continued professional development and mentoring for postdoctoral research associates. This may also include education in various aspects of innovation (intellectual property, entrepreneurship, etc.) and other higher education activities (i.e., new course materials or curricula).
  • Broadening the participation of underrepresented groups – CCI goals for increasing engagement by underrepresented groups, plans for reaching those goals, and an evaluation strategy.
  • Informal science communication – plans for communicating the CCI research to public audiences and possible ways to evaluate the impact of these outreach efforts.

Eligibility:

Who May Serve as PI:

  • While these proposals will reflect the research of many investigators, only the name of the Principal Investigator (PI) should appear on the cover sheet. All other investigators are considered Faculty Associates (non-coPI senior personnel). An investigator may participate (as PI or Faculty Associate) in only one CCI preliminary proposal and one CCI full proposal (Phase I or Phase II) submitted to this competition. The PI must be affiliated with an eligible submitting organization.

Limit on Number of Proposals per PI or Co-PI: 1

  • An investigator may participate (as PI or Faculty Associate) in only one preliminary proposal and one full proposal (Phase I or Phase II) submitted in response to this solicitation. The PI must be affiliated with an eligible submitting organization.

The team of investigators for a Phase I proposal must include at least four senior researchers with complementary expertise. While there is no upper limit on the number of Phase I investigators, proposers are cautioned to avoid teams that are too large to collaborate effectively. The available resources should also be carefully considered in assembling the team. CCIs may partner with researchers from industry, national laboratories and international organizations. See detailed guidance below for non-U.S. or non-academic researchers.

Available Funding:

NSF anticipates making three new Phase I awards (up to $1,800,000 for 3 years) as standard or continuing grants.

Link to Full RFP:

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17564/nsf17564.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click#elig

ONR Young Investigator Program

Sponsor:

Office of Naval Research

Deadline:

September 15, 2017

Summary:

The Office of Naval Research (ONR) is interested in receiving proposals for its Young Investigator Program (YIP). ONR’s Young Investigator Program (YIP) seeks to identify and support academic scientists and engineers who are in their first or second full-time tenure-track or tenure-trackequivalent academic appointment, have begun their first appointment on or after 31 December 2012, and who show exceptional promise for doing creative research. The objectives of this program are to attract outstanding faculty members of Institutions of Higher Education (hereafter also called “universities”) to the Department of the Navy’s Science and Technology (S&T) research program, to support their research, and to encourage their teaching and research careers.

Proposals addressing research areas (as described in the ONR Science and Technology Department section of ONR’s website at www.onr.navy.mil) which are of interest to ONR program officers will be considered. Contact information for each division (a subgroup of an S&T Department) is also listed within the S&T section of the website.

Eligibility:

The Principal Investigator of a proposal must be a U.S. citizen, national, or permanent resident (on the date proposals are due), holding a first or second full-time tenure-track or tenure-track-equivalentfaculty position at that university, and has begun her/his first full-time appointment on or after 31 December 2012.

Available Funding:

Applicants may request up to $170,000 per year for three (3) years. (Additional funds for capital equipment which enhances the Young Investigator’s proposed research may be requested.)

Link to Full RFP:

https://www.grants.gov/custom/viewOppDetails.jsp?oppId=294449

SFARI Bridge to Independence Award Request for Applications

Sponsor:

Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative (SFARI)

Deadline:

August 7, 2017

Summary:

The Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative (SFARI) seeks to improve the understanding, diagnosis and treatment of autism spectrum disorders by funding innovative research of the highest quality and relevance.  In order to sustain this level of scientific excellence in future years, SFARI is extending our support to promising early-career investigators.

Grants awarded through the Bridge to Independence Award program are intended to invest in the next generation of top autism investigators by identifying talented early-career scientists interested in autism research and facilitating their transition to an independent research career. This request for applications (RFA) is aimed at senior postdoctoral fellows who intend to seek tenure-track faculty positions during the 2017–18 academic year. Successful applicants will be notified that they are finalists in the Bridge to Independence Award program and will have one year to submit an approval application, which includes confirmation of a tenure-track professorship at a U.S. academic institution, review of the institution’s research environment and resources, and institutional signoff.

Eligibility:

  • Applicants must hold a Ph.D., M.D. or equivalent degree
  • Applicants must have fewer than six (6) years of postdoctoral or otherwise mentored training.
  • Applicants must be currently in non-independent, mentored, training positions, as recognized by their institution. The following guidelines should be used to distinguish independent from non-independent positions (modified from NIH’s K99/R00 Program Announcement eligibility section): Evidence for non-independence may include:
  • The applicant’s research is entirely funded by another investigator’s grants.
  • The applicant’s research is conducted entirely in another investigator’s assigned space.
  • According to institutional policy, the applicant is not allowed to submit an application for an NIH research grant (e.g., R01) or SFARI grant (e.g, Explorer, Pilot, Research, and Targeted awards.)
  • Applicants must be actively seeking a tenure-track position at a U.S. institution of higher education during 2017-18 academic year.
  • Applicants are not eligible if they are recipients of other career development awards with similar budgetary scope as the SFARI Bridge to Independence award. These include, but are not limited to:
    • NIH K99/R00 (please note that other K awardees may be eligible, e.g., K01 and K08)
    • Burroughs-Wellcome Fund Career Award for Medical Scientists
    • American Academy of Neurology Career Development Award
    • Howard Hughes Medical Institute Hanna H. Gray fellowship

You are strongly encouraged to contact SFARI prior to grant submission if you believe your career development award is comparable to the BTI award but is not listed above.

  • Applicants must not have accepted a formal offer for a tenure-track faculty position.
  • There are no citizenship requirements.

Available Funding:

The principal investigator (PI) will receive research support at a fixed rate of $150,000 per year, including 20 percent for indirect costs (see SFARI policies), for up to three (3) years. Funds may not be used toward the PI’s salary but may provide salary support for other laboratory personnel. Institutional start-up packages may not be reduced because of SFARI funding.

Link to Full RFP:

https://sfari.org/funding/grants/bridge-to-independence-rfa/bridge-to-independence-award-request-for-applications

National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education (NICE) Stakeholder Engagement Program

Sponsor:

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), United States Department of Commerce (DoC)

Deadline:

August 1, 2017

Summary:

Every aspect of the NICE Strategic Plan requires outreach and coordination with multiple stakeholders. NICE seeks to provide assistance to an organization engaged in building national (and exploring international) relationships to further advance cybersecurity education and training, building the cybersecurity workforce development community with a year-round communication strategy and capping that engagement by planning and holding the NICE Annual Conference and Expo. 

For the NICE Annual Conference and Expo, NICE seeks an organization to lead the conference planning and execution efforts. This includes the full range of preconference activities from determining tracks, content, and speakers and arranging the venue to managing the conference logistics to post conference wrap up activities. NICE expects the conference to be kept affordable to a wide range of participants.

The stakeholder engagement strategy must reflect the need to reach out to and build consensus among diverse stakeholders including but not limited to:

  • Employers,
  • Educators and trainers,
  • Certification providers,
  • Workforce development managers,
  • Economic development administrators, and
  • Policymakers.

Note that this is a list of high-level examples and not meant to be comprehensive. NICE encourages applicants to provide details on how they will reach stakeholders with different interests within these broad categories. As a national initiative, it is critical that the outreach strategy and conference participation demonstrate a commitment to diversity, including regional diversity. Conferences must move about the country from year to year within the continental United States.

Applicants should plan for annual conferences of at least 750 to 1000 attendees with venues that keep costs affordable to the community and have good transportation options for attendees. NICE anticipates that this will be up to a five-year award for long-term community building with the possibility of converting this award to an institutional award at the conclusion of the award period.

Eligibility:

Applicants may be any U.S.-located non-Federal entity. Please note that, for the purposes of this NOFO, individuals and unincorporated sole proprietors are not considered “non-Federal entities” and are not eligible apply.

Available Funding:

NIST anticipates funding one award for approximately $250,000 per year for up to five years.

Link to Full RFP:

https://www.grants.gov/custom/viewOppDetails.jsp?oppId=294083

Administrative Supplements for Participation in the Concept to Clinic: Commercializing Innovation (C3i) Program (Admin Supp) (PA-17-286)

Sponsor:

National Institutes of Health

Deadline:

June 30, 2017

Summary:

The purpose of the administrative supplement is to provide support for NIH-funded investigators to participate in an entrepreneurship training course, the Concept to Clinic: Commercializing Innovation (C3i) Program.  The C3i Program is designed to provide medical device innovators with the specialized business frameworks and essential tools for successful translation of biomedical technologies from the lab (concept) to the market (clinic). Through this program, the NIH fosters the development and commercialization of early-stage biomedical technologies by engaging investigators who are interested in better understanding the value of their innovation in addressing an unmet market need. The curriculum and customized mentoring provided by the C3i Program are intended to guide investigators as they assess the commercial viability and potential business opportunity for their innovation. Prospective applicants are strongly encouraged to contact NIH Scientific/Research staff for more information about the program before applying.

 Eligibility:

Participating Institutes:

  • National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB)
  • National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
  • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
  • National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)

Additional funds may be awarded as supplements to parent awards from the Institutes above using the following Activity Code(s):

  • P01 Research Program Projects
  • P41 Biotechnology Resource Grants
  • R01 Research Project Grant
  • R24 Resource-Related Research Projects
  • R41/R42 Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Grant – Phase I, Phase II, and Fast-Track
  • R43/R44 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grant – Phase I, Phase II, and Fast-Track
  • U01 Research Project – Cooperative Agreements
  • U44 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Cooperative Agreements – Phase II
  • UG3/UH3 Exploratory/Developmental Phased Award Cooperative Agreement
  • UH2/UH3 Phase Innovation Awards Cooperative Agreement

Available Funding:

NIH intends to commit up to $500,000 in direct costs in FY 2017 to fund 24 awards.

Application budgets are limited to no more than $30,000 in direct costs for SBIR/STTR parent awards (R41, R42, R43, R44, U44) and $18,000 in direct costs for other parent awards (P01, P41, R01, R24, U01, UG3, UH2, UH3). The award budget should only be used to cover costs associated with participation in the C3i Program.

Link to Full RFP:

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-17-286.html